References

From Susan

Hi guys, Finals are finally over for the semester, so now that I have a little time (‘little’ being the operative word), I wanted to post something GOOD that’s happened, and maybe will help some other folks, too. Nope, doesn’t have a darn thing to do with nutrition. 🙂
As most of you know, I have a very nice coming-six Anglo-Arab sired by Karahty and out of my good old TB eventing mare. He’d been started out well, and when I moved up to Colorado, I put him with someone to condition while I was in vet school classes. I won’t rehash that whole thing, but suffice it to say, I was very, very unhappy over the physical, mental and athletic condition of the horse I got back. Dakota’s manners definitely needed some work, he needed alot of consistent ringwork and had some problems to get over, like pulling back while tied and herd-boundness and things like that.
Karen Chaton rode him for me for awhile, and made a lot of really great progress, but when she left for XP last spring, I put Dakota with a So Cal trainer near Lancaster named Larry Jeffery. Larry works primarily with young horses and ‘problem children’, and boy, am I happy with the job he’s done with Dakota. I don’t have a chance to see him in person too often, but have gotten progress videos from Larry, plus have visited a few times to ride my horse. What is really evident is how well taken care of my horse is—he’s relaxed, happy, eager to go to work, is groomed within an inch of his life (and you can tell the difference between a horse that’s really groomed daily versus one that got hosed off an hour before you got there), and all of his problems are long gone. He does everything you ask of him as though it never would occur to him to do it any other way. And when you ask him to do something new, or something he hasn’t quite got the hang of yet, you can see the wheels turning, concentrating on doing what Larry is asking him to do, working *with* his rider, and not thinking about how to get out of it, or thinking about throwing a fit or otherwise avoiding something new he has to learn. It’s a real pleasure to watch the process. He’d solved the problems in a month or two of consistent work, but I’ve left him there since then so he could really turn him into a pushbutton horse (and also because I didn’t have time to bring him home until next spring). Boy, that horse can do *everything* now. A trained horse, what a concept .
Larry isn’t a real polished, sophisticated trainer with a slick barn, he’s just real quiet and easy-going, loves the horses and just keeps working with the horses until they do it right. No yelling or flailing around, no picking fights with the horses, just a real understanding of how they think and learn. I could just sit and watch him work all day long, it’s such a pleasure to see a honest-to-god, old-time, this-is-the-real-thing horseman.
Anyway, I thought I would post this first of all because I think we need to shout just as loud when we see something right as when we see something wrong. But also just in case anyone in the western states needs someone like that for their horses. Most of the horses he works with are the runaways, the kickers, the I-don’t-wanna-do-that-and-you-cant-make-me problem children that we all run across. I just can’t say enough good things, enough that I was willing to send my horse 1000 miles away from where I live, and will send Dakota’s baby sister to start as soon as she’s old enough. Nope, Larry didn’t ask me to write this and I’m not getting anything from it. I just think he’s worth telling other people about, and you guys all know by now that my opinion can’t be bought. Larry charges somewhere around $650-700 a month for full time board and training (which is about the going rate), most horses are ready to go home in 90 days and he’s worth every last penny and then some. I sure see a lot of people fighting with their horses rather than having fun, and this seems better to me.:-)))
For anyone that wants to talk to him, Larry’s email is longviewranch@msn.com , or you can talk to me if I can answer questions.
Anyway, just thought I would pass along the info for anyone who’s horse needs to see the error of their ways.

From Cathi

Just a quick note to thank you for all your help with Murphy.When I sent him to you he acted like a spoiled child with a bad attitude,but with the added challenge of being over 17.2 hands and built like a tank.If you remember,before he came to you he would refuse to move forward and would round his back threatening to buck when I put my leg on.Your persistent hard work and training principles did wonders and he came home in a completely different state of mind.His attitude towards me and our work is one of willingness,cooperation and partnership.He has accepted the transition to the basics of dressage-traveling forward,straight,balanced and willing to accept light contact with the bit.I have trailered him to different locations and he has maintained his good attitude,even when confronted with new and scary situations.Thank you for giving Murphy and I the opportunity to build a positive relationship that will last a lifetime!

From Ed

You are now our horse Guru. We are doing very well with Harley, thanks to your help. The last two weeks since he’s been back have been the most rewarding two weeks of riding we have had in the last 8 years of owning horses. We had Harley only about one month before enrolling him in your training course. He was a nervous horse always pacing and spooking at everything and we knew we could not ride him without difficulty. The woman we bought him from was honest enough to tell us that he had not been worked with in about two years. The first trainer we worked with moved unexpectedly out of State and we were left up a creek without a paddle. We knew of other trainers in the area but their training methods seemed questionable and we were not sure we could rely on them. However,our farrier Allan who has been very reliable told us “don’t worry, Larry can help you. “After doing some additional research we felt secure with leaving Harley in your hands.
When I came to see how Harley was doing a month into his training all I could think was Wow! Already in just this short time he was a much calmer horse that paid attention. Over Harley’s 3 months of training, you also trained us, patiently answering all our questions. My husband especially appreciated the time you spent with him, helping him so he could keep Harley’s respect. Ed is so happy, he comes home everyday with tales of his good experiences with Harley. My own experience is that when I come to get my own little Arab Sassy from the paddock area she shares with Harley,
Harley’s the one that comes to me and stands at attention. Of course I always reward him with a rub on his forehead. He’s one trained horse. It’s certainly been worth the money and then some.

From Melissa

Howdy Larry!
Funny you called, I had this written in my journal, maybe you can use it, maybe not. Hope everything is going good, and I hope to talk to you soon.

I purchased a green 3 yr. old Mustang mare a year prior to meeting Larry Jeffery. I would take her on trails once in a while, mainly just ride in the arena where it was safe, and where I could “train” her. Everything seemed to be going o.k. until one day “out of the blue” she started acting up. She would begin getting antsy on trail rearing, bucking, etc. If we were with other horses, she would be more interested in them than with me. I could no longer take her down any steep trails. She would buck taking me down any path that was too steep for her. She would run, full speed up any incline. I also couldn’t ride on any days after a windy storm, for there would be twigs and sticks on the trail that would pose a problem for her.

Since I basically couldn’t ride on trail, I decided to ride in the arena. But now tying her up became a problem. She would dance around instead of letting me tack her up. It escalated to the point where I had her fully saddled, and she pulled back so hard she broke 3 leather halters, 1 lead rope, and permanently damaged the brand new western saddle I just bought. I was scared to ride my own horse. I had no motivation to even see her at this point because she was causing me more sadness than happiness.

After falling off and breaking my wrist, I decided to either sell her to a cannery, or bite the bullet and pay for some serious training.

I had heard of Larry through several horsemen that I respected. I got his number and gave him a ring. On the other end was a soft, kind, and somewhat weathered voice. He listened. He asked me what she was doing, how I was doing, and what to do till I got help. He struck me as someone who understood horses better than most people. Why? Because he was very interested in my rantings about my problems with my horse. He didn’t try to sell me on any “fix it” gimmicks, he just stood on the other line, quietly letting me go on and on. Right up front he told me he needed 1-3 months to work with her. The price was right and I was making plans the next day to trailer her out.

One month later, when I came to pick her up, I was truly amazed. She didn’t quite look like my horse, it looked more like another sorrel horse out there cantering, stopping, and ground tying. I walked up a little closer and sure enough, it was my Ginger. She was standing perfectly still, eyes focused. I could see a change in her demeanor. She looked, how can I put this….mature. Like she had figured out what it was to be a real horse. Like she had graduated from horsy high-school. We loaded her into the trailer, and teary-eyed, I told Larry I was thankful. I was excited to get her home, but deep down inside I was fearful that she would revert back to her old ways and become unmanageable. I decided to stick to a regimen, and work with her everyday, and try to better myself as a horsewoman.

We unloaded her from the trailer and to this day, six months later, we are closer than ever! We are a team. We do 1st level dressage, obstacle courses, trailer to new locations and even go on camping trips. I am now able to enjoy my horse, and work with her as a partnership. I never miss a day to go up and ride. I am no longer scared to ride my horse. I am no longer fearful that she will rear or buck me off. I have confidence, through working with Larry and learning to be a better rider, that everything is manageable. There is nothing your horse won’t or can’t do for you. They are willing creatures, and most importantly forgiving. If I hadn’t taken her to him when I did, she would’ve never made it. I have Larry to thank for giving me back the joy that is horse ownership.

From Susan B

Hi guys, Finals are finally over for the semester, so now that I have a little time (‘little’ being the operative word), I wanted to post something GOOD that’s happened, and maybe will help some other folks, too. Nope, doesn’t have a darn thing to do with nutrition. 🙂
As most of you know, I have a very nice coming-six Anglo-Arab sired by Karahty and out of my good old TB eventing mare. He’d been started out well, and when I moved up to Colorado, I put him with someone to condition while I was in vet school classes. I won’t rehash that whole thing, but suffice it to say, I was very, very unhappy over the physical, mental and athletic condition of the horse I got back. Dakota’s manners definitely needed some work, he needed alot of consistent ringwork and had some problems to get over, like pulling back while tied and herd-boundness and things like that.
Karen Chaton rode him for me for awhile, and made a lot of really great progress, but when she left for XP last spring, I put Dakota with a So Cal trainer near Lancaster named Larry Jeffery. Larry works primarily with young horses and ‘problem children’, and boy, am I happy with the job he’s done with Dakota. I don’t have a chance to see him in person too often, but have gotten progress videos from Larry, plus have visited a few times to ride my horse. What is really evident is how well taken care of my horse is—he’s relaxed, happy, eager to go to work, is groomed within an inch of his life (and you can tell the difference between a horse that’s really groomed daily versus one that got hosed off an hour before you got there), and all of his problems are long gone. He does everything you ask of him as though it never would occur to him to do it any other way. And when you ask him to do something new, or something he hasn’t quite got the hang of yet, you can see the wheels turning, concentrating on doing what Larry is asking him to do, working *with* his rider, and not thinking about how to get out of it, or thinking about throwing a fit or otherwise avoiding something new he has to learn. It’s a real pleasure to watch the process. He’d solved the problems in a month or two of consistent work, but I’ve left him there since then so he could really turn him into a pushbutton horse (and also because I didn’t have time to bring him home until next spring). Boy, that horse can do *everything* now. A trained horse, what a concept .
Larry isn’t a real polished, sophisticated trainer with a slick barn, he’s just real quiet and easy-going, loves the horses and just keeps working with the horses until they do it right. No yelling or flailing around, no picking fights with the horses, just a real understanding of how they think and learn. I could just sit and watch him work all day long, it’s such a pleasure to see a honest-to-god, old-time, this-is-the-real-thing horseman.
Anyway, I thought I would post this first of all because I think we need to shout just as loud when we see something right as when we see something wrong. But also just in case anyone in the western states needs someone like that for their horses. Most of the horses he works with are the runaways, the kickers, the I-don’t-wanna-do-that-and-you-cant-make-me problem children that we all run across. I just can’t say enough good things, enough that I was willing to send my horse 1000 miles away from where I live, and will send Dakota’s baby sister to start as soon as she’s old enough. Nope, Larry didn’t ask me to write this and I’m not getting anything from it. I just think he’s worth telling other people about, and you guys all know by now that my opinion can’t be bought. Larry charges somewhere around $650-700 a month for full time board and training (which is about the going rate), most horses are ready to go home in 90 days and he’s worth every last penny and then some. I sure see a lot of people fighting with their horses rather than having fun, and this seems better to me.:-)))
For anyone that wants to talk to him, Larry’s email is longviewranch@msn.com , or you can talk to me if I can answer questions.
Anyway, just thought I would pass along the info for anyone who’s horse needs to see the error of their ways.

From Paula

When I brought my Arabian mare to Larry for help, he was truly our last hope. She was my first horse, and she was very smart. Soon she had me too scared to ride her, or even groom her. She was spoiled rotten and had my number, so to speak. After being thrown, reared up on and had bite & kick threats tossed my way, I was more than ready to sell her. I didn’t like her and didn’t enjoy being around her at all. A friend highly recommended Larry for help. She said I really had nothing to lose because I couldn’t sell her the way she was anyway. She was very ear shy, and had a habit of clenching her teeth that bridling her became a very trying experience. She wouldn’t stand to be saddled and was always very pushy. She was fast becoming a dangerous horse to be around. I took my mare to Larry with the intention of selling her. I figured at least maybe he could help her get over the ear shy thing. Then some VERY experienced rider could buy her, cheap. The first clue I had to the changes my horse was making was on one of my visits to Larry’s ranch. He not only rode her with no problems, she ground tied beautifully and showed great affection towards him. Only once did she try to creep up on him when he and I were talking at the round pen fence. Larry turner and verbally reprimanded her. To my disbelief, she lowered her head, backup to where she had been, and stood still until he asked her to come forward. AMAZING! She was with Larry for three months. In that three months, she has become such a different horse, we renamed her. I still have Sophie. She is a joy to ride, to talk to, to groom and to just be around. She is affectionate, and patient. Larry Jeffery not only works miracles with your horse, he also works with you, the owner to understand and handle your horse better. I will only use Larry for my horses and highly recommend him to anyone who needs help with their horses. By the way, before I met Larry, I tried 2 different trainers who both told me my horse was to dangerous for me to be around and I should just sell her. Had I not gone to him, she would have been sold at auction.

From Kimberly

I need you to understand what a wonderful gift you have given me.
I tried to sum it up as best I could without being very long. But I found I could not leave out any details because it just means so much to me.

I had always thought of myself as a well rounded horseperson. I mean I had been riding since I was seven, by the time I was fifteen, I was teaching riding lessons to younger kids. I was on my way to becoming a trainer. Unfortunately my parents didn’t think it was a wise future. So I sold my horses and went to fashion college (as if?). Leaving my dreams of becoming “Corky Randall-the trainer of the black stallion movies” behind me.

Years passed and so did my mother and with the money she left me I bought a little horse realizing that my passion had not been tarnished. Years went by and I was forced to sell yet again, in pursuit of my career. More years passed and so did my father and yet again with the money I was left I bought a horse. This time I wanted to do all the training myself and prove to myself that could. So I got a 2 1/2 year old, green broke, apex quarter gelding.

So happy to have a horse again I was quite fearless and didn’t hesitate to race though the hills with him without realizing that with everything I did I was training my horse. This was all fine while he was young, but as he matured into quite the athlete I came to realize he was more horse than I was a rider. And just because you can stay on doesn’t mean you can ride. All that I had learned through all the years of experience could not help me when my horse came to challenge me. It was quite embarrassing not be able to calm my horse when ridding with others, he would feed off any thing the other horses or riders would do and wouldn’t want to give me his attention. I tried everything and everyone had an answer yet nothing worked and my patience wore thin. I would either have a wonderful ride or a horrible ride. There was no rhyme or reasoning that I could distinguish. I was heartbroken and distraught. I thought of myself as a “joke” not a “horsewoman”. Then I heard through the ranch grapevine of a trainer- “you” and then I saw the work you had done with a horse from my ranch where I board. And I saw that your rates were incredibly affordable. And I thought to myself, I couldn’t afford not to try you. I sent my horse to you for 3 months, and received your years of experience that have worked. I learned more with the hours I spent with you than I had learned in my entire lifetime it’s not only teaching the horse but reprogramming the rider as well. I was humbled in your presence to the point of feeling as if I had never ridden before and challenged to look at myself in a new light. I took so much away from our brief time together and have incorporated it into into my daily routines with my horse. I now understand how to convey what I want to my horse in a way that he understands and responds to. And I also now know that a relationship with a horse can be on a much higher plane than I had ever imagined. And you as an equestrian have to learn what the right combination is for interacting with each horse. With every moment you spend with your horse you are conditioning a response and that’s something I wasn’t aware of until it was too late-
thank you for coming into my life and showing me the way to regain my dreams.

I registered my horse iyupatala before I ever met you. In American Indian it means “one with” because that is something I have always strived for. And my horse and I will be one day………

From Sandra

Larry,
I can’t thank you enough. You have worked a miracle even with your hands tied and have saved my horse. Mojave is a thoroughbred mare 17+ hands about 1200 lbs. “There is really a sweet horse in there somewhere, but she has been so badly handled in the pass she has given up on people!” stated Larry after he worked with her for 1 month. Larry’s job was to get through her attitude, and stubbornness so that she would be willing to work with people again. Mojave had given up on the human race. It took a year of my working with her to breakthrough her indifference for her to even respond to scratching an itchy spot. She would be so nervous about going to her stall she would not even stop at the hay wagon and eat hay.
When we found Larry we were at our wits end. We had 2 choices, put her down, or breed her. I would not sell her as she was too dangerous and we don’t have the facilities to breed her. I had been worrying this problem for almost a year.
I have been riding for over 30 years dressage, trail, and hunter horses. I have had many horses throughout the years, many of them thoroughbreds, but I have never had one with the mental and physical abuse that I discovered with Mojave. When I bought her, I lounged her, and rode her without any issues. She had not been taken care of well or treated very well. She was very manageable. However, once I moved her she just went explosive. I consulted my vet, and he stated she had lost all her support and her mind was extremely fragile. As time progressed she became even more barn sour, did not want to be ridden and was just demanding to have her way. One day I rode her in the round pen and everything went well. The next day I went to ride her and it was a battle from saddling onward. She was just plain dangerous.
My daughter told me about an ad she had seen in the Horse Trader for Larry. I called and spoke to him and went to visit his ranch to watch him work. I then made arrangements for him to pickup Mojave. Mojave with all her bad manners has always loaded the first time. But of course, not this time. I was so impressed with how he handled Mojave. No fights, not abuse, just calmness. She was in the trailer within 10 minutes and calm, no fear, no temper tantrums. My daughter and I went up to see her in her 3rd week of training and Larry rode her, walk, trot and canter. No fights, no abuse, and for Mojave, she was extremely calm. To make matters even worse for Larry, she was extremely sore on her right front foot and Larry could not canter her as is required for his training. She had also developed some breathing problems, I think this was because of her nerves.
Due to Mojave’s physical problems, Larry was not able to work her as he normally would and I am continuing to work her according to his training plan. I am riding and or handling her at least 5 times a week in the stable arenas and around the stable where we board. Each day she is better. Larry has worked a miracle even with his hands tied.
Mojave has now been home for almost 3 months and is still progressing. An abscess in her right front foot appeared the week we brought her home (the reason she was lame). She enjoys getting out of her stall now, which is an improvement, and is willing to work with me. We are continuing to go forward. We occasionally have bad days but they are fewer and fewer and they are not near as bad as they once were.
I will keep you updated on our progress.

From Allison

Well, the year of 2000 was the year of the horse (or should I say horses), well it least it was for me. I went through one horse right after the other, flushing more money down the drain than I care to admit. One spooked too much, one was too young and untrained and another incredibly barn sour, and so on and so on. During that year, I went through 4 horses and even a mule. Each time thinking that if I maybe spent a little more money, I would get the perfect horse that I could feel confident on. Me, a professional dog trainer surely would not let any animal get the best of me, but horse after horse, instead of gaining more and more confidence, I was losing it by the bucketful.

So· at last, I finally thought I had obtained the perfect horse. Cute small (very important for a rider with as little confidence as I) and she seemed unbelievably calm. I rode her a few days at the stables where she was for sale and then finally decided that she was the horse for me. Then, once I got her home, the pattern started all over again. She started to get worse and worse and Iâm talking about in a matter of days. People were starting to say that they thought she must have been drugged when I bought her. This could not be happening to me, not again!!

Well, I thought that I would hang in there and keep trying to work with her, so my husband and I would go for small rides in the area. The one day, we decided to make an extended journey to the community arena. The ride there was uneventful, then once inside the arena and for no apparent reason, she threw me, and I broke two ribs. What a setback! For the next month, I spent the vast majority of my time (when I could bear the pain) working her in the round pen.

Shortly thereafter, we bought a little spread in the Elsinore Mountains and were all excited about getting our horses on our own property where we could spend some real quality time with them. Picture this, a house full of boxes, six kids to move and in tow, new horse facilities installed and the weather so cold we left the ice cube trays on the porch to make ice. What a scene. That night when the horses were trailered in, my husband went out to blanket the horses and moments later came hobbling in. I peered over the stacked boxes to ask him what was wrong, well· my horse had kicked him and broke his pelvis. My father in law had to take him to the hospital while I searched through the boxes for the shotgun and ammo!!

Fortunately, I had a Horsetrader Magazine atop one of the boxes and in a rare moment of peace, I looked in the magazine and saw Larryâs ad. It said that he specialized in problem horses, so· the next day, Larry showed up and hauled off my ãproblemä horse. In less than three months, Larry brought back my ãproblem ã horse, which is now, for me, the Perfect Horse. Along with the horse came a ton of advice and horse knowledge that, simply speaking said the problem was not with the horse, but mostly with me!

I had used other trainers, but Larry put the training in such simple terms, it helped me to really get inside my horses head and stay there. What Larry was able to do, was to change her attitude and then teach me how to get her to respect me. Now, Larry comes up to our ranch to teach daylong clinics to my friends and me who really want to learn to ride and how to keep our horses educated. More and more people have decided to join the clinic because they see the wonderful changes that have happened with those of us learning from Larry.

Now, my 13-year-old son went out on the trail with my perfect horse, and came back safe and sound and with the desire to get his own horse. Now 2001 will be the year of the perfect horse for my family and me.